Working in groups and social loafing essay

A plan for change Overview and plan to prevent social loafing Anyone who has ever been involved in a group project is familiar with the phenomenon of social loafing. Even in school, there is always one student who will coast along on the hard work of other students who are more conscientious and dedicated.

Working in groups and social loafing essay

Social loafing Save In social psychologysocial loafing is the phenomenon of a person exerting less effort to achieve a goal when he or she works in a group than when working alone. Research on social loafing began with rope pulling experiments by Ringelmann, who found that members of a group tended to exert less effort in pulling a rope than did individuals alone.

In more recent research, studies involving modern technology, such as online and distributed groups, have also shown clear evidence of social loafing. Many of the causes of social loafing stem from individual members feeling that his or her effort will not matter to the group.

He found that, when he asked a group of men to pull on a ropethey did not pull as hard collectively as they did when each was pulling alone. This research did not distinguish whether this was the result of the individuals in a group putting in less effort or of poor coordination within the group.

Research Proposal: Managers Prevent Social Loafing … | 6 Pages, APA Style

In the pseudo-groups, the researchers' assistants only pretended to pull on the rope. The results showed a decrease in the participants' performance. Groups of participants who all exerted effort exhibited the largest declines.

Because the pseudo-groups were isolated from coordination effects since the participant's confederates did not physically pull the ropeIngham proved that communication alone did not account for the effort decrease, and that motivational losses were the more likely cause of the performance decline.

They showed this by blindfolding male college students while making them wear headphones that masked all noise. They then asked them to shout both in actual groups and pseudogroups in which they shouted alone but believed they were shouting with others.

When subjects believed one other person was shouting, they shouted 82 percent as intensely as they did alone, but with five others, their effort decreased to 74 percent. Thus if the person is dividing up the work to be performed or the amount of reward he expects to receive, he will work less hard in groups.

From a psychological state, it proposes that Expectancy multiplied by Instrumentality multiplied by Valence of Outcome produces the resulting Motivational Force.

When working collectively, other factors frequently determine performance, and valued outcomes are also divided among all group members.

All individuals are assumed to try to maximize the expected utility of their actions. The CEM also acknowledges that some valued outcomes do not depend on performance.

For example, exerting strong effort when working on intrinsically meaningful tasks or with highly respected team members may result in self-satisfaction or approval from the group, even if the high effort had little to no impact on tangible performance outcomes.

The magnitude of social loafing is reduced for women and individuals originating from Eastern cultures. Individuals are more likely to loaf when their co-workers are expected to perform well.

Individuals reduce social loafing when working with acquaintances and do not loaf at all when they work in highly valued groups. Members would contribute less in both quantity and quality, final group output would be of lower quality, and a group's output would be affected both by individual factors and contextual factors.

A sample of undergraduate business students was randomly split into forty teams half of the teams were four-person and half eight-person which were randomly assigned to either a collocated or distributed setting.

The participants were to complete a task that asked them to act as a board of directors of a winery with an image problem.Groups. Social psychologists consider a group to be composed of two or more people who interact and depend on each other in some way.

Examples of groups include a baseball team, an Internet listserv, a college psychology class, and a cult. Essay on social loafing, In social psychology, social loafing is the phenomenon of a person exerting less effort to achieve a goal when they work in a group than when they work alone.

This is seen as one of the main reasons groups are sometimes less productive than the combined performance of their members working as individuals, but should be distinguished from.

Working in groups and social loafing essay

In social psychology, social loafing is the phenomenon of a person exerting less effort to achieve a goal when they work in a group than when they work alone. [1] [2] This is seen as one of the main reasons groups are sometimes less productive than the combined performance of their members working.

Why or why not?How does working effectively on a team give you an advantage in the workplace?How do groups normally develop?How does the effectiveness of the team members influence the group’s development process?

Model Answer Social Loafing. - Download as Word Doc .doc /.docx), PDF File .pdf), Text File .txt) or read online. Social loafing describes the tendency of individuals to put forth less effort from MGT at University of Phoenix.

Group processes

I have engaged in social loafing; Working in Groups and Teams. Viewing now. Interested in Working in Groups and Teams?%(36).

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